Australian Classification Board gives green light to child porn

Maia Kobabe uses e/em/eir pronouns. That’s nonsense you can ignore.

Maia Kobabe also fantasises about paedophilia and draws pictures of it in a book she wants your kids to read. That’s nonsense too. But it should not be ignored.

For instance, on page 135 of her book, Gender Queer, Kobabe writes about how she discovered masturbation and the fantasies she used to ‘reach a point of satisfaction’.

Accompanying Kobabe’s words are her pictures. After all, her book is a picture book for kids.

And the picture Kobabe chose to draw of the fantasy she used to ‘reach a point of satisfaction’ is a picture of a naked man with an erection touching the genitalia of a boy.

Yes. You read that right. See for yourself:

It’s not clear whether Kobabe wants to be the man. Or the boy. Or both. Regardless, she clearly gets off on the idea of a man sexually abusing a boy and is not at all ashamed to admit this.

Normally, people are shunned when they admit in public that they fantasise about paedophilia.

Maia Kobabe, on the other hand, drew her fantasy in a book and it’s been placed on children’s shelves in libraries all over earth.

It is quite incredible, really. Hat’s off to Kobabe, who has used her sexual confusion and crayons to do more than most to normalise paedophilia in the minds of kids across the English-speaking world.

However, she has not been acting alone. Such a radical revolution in morality also requires state support and Kobabe also has plenty of that.

It seems that public libraries are the biggest purchasers of her book. And they can buy it because other public authorities give it the green light.

For instance, the Australian Classification Board has just decided that Kobabe’s book is unrestricted to sell in Australia.

The Classification Board even put out a press release earlier this week, stating:

‘In the Board’s view, this publication can be accommodated in the Unrestricted classification as, within the context of the publication, the treatment of themes is not high in impact or offensive, and the treatment of sex and nudity is also not high in impact and is not exploitative, offensive, gratuitous or very detailed. Given the context of the publication’s narrative and its literary, artistic and educational merits, the Board does not consider that the publication contains material that offends a reasonable adult to the extent that it should be restricted.’

Ah, the old Jedi mind tricks at work again.

That picture of porn is not a picture of porn, says the state. Trust us. Don’t believe your lyin’ eyes.

I guess I really should not be surprised.

After all, the same government that says these images taken from Gender Queer are not pornographic also says that it cannot define a woman.

If this is the best the loonies running this joint have got, then we will win this battle. There is no doubt about that.

Eventually, the Classification Board will be exposed and embarrassed. And in the meantime, there is absolutely nothing authorities can do to stop mums and dads and grandparents all over this nation from stuffing Gender Queer into the sanitary waste bins inside the non-gender specific toilets in every school and public library in Australia.

Gender Queer will be taken from the shelves, one way or the other. We will win this fight.

Author: Bernard Gaynor

Bernard Gaynor is a married father of nine children. He has a background in military intelligence, Arabic language and culture and is an outspoken advocate of conservative and family values.

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6 Comments

  1. Dear Bernard,

    I support your effort to have inappropriate books removed from Australian public libraries, and given honest classifications.

    I wish to add my 2 cents to see if I can help with this.

    I think it is no good simply to say that such and such books are bad and have them banned. The reason is that comics artists have already experienced this, in the 1950s. The underground comix movement in the late 1960s, spearheaded by Robert Crumb, was an artistic response (i.e. the response of artists using their medium of choice to a certain stimulus) to the censorship that followed the widespread ‘bad book bashing’ in the USA in the 1950s. Underground comix featured a lot of introspection and sex and were a direct response to the censorship of the 50s, which in turn was inspired by a book by a psychologist, and then some Senate hearings in the USA, then book bannings and even burnings. Comics like Gender Queer can trace their lineage to underground comix like those of Crumb.

    This is why I say it is not enough to say ‘You must not do this.” It didn’t work last time and the results were arguably worse than if things had been handled differently. You also have to say, “Rather, you must do this, instead.”

    Perhaps you don’t know about the origins of Tintin, which is arguably one of the best comics ever made. It’s almost too good. Ever notice that there are no pretty girls in Tintin, and he doesn’t have a girlfriend, and the morals are crystal clear, and correct? It was originally published by a Catholic youth newspaper. The publisher forbade Tintin to have a girlfriend. Tintin had to reflect the values and morals of the paper he was appearing in. Later the comic was published by a Nazi paper during Belgium’s occupation, and while Herge was criticised for being a collaborator, Tintin was never pro-Nazi. Later Tintin was published in an eponymous magazine, but Herge never altered Tintin’s foundation characteristics. The nearest he got to a significant change was taking up yoga and wearing a Greenpeace sign and bellbottom trousers in his second last adventure, Tintin and the Picaros which I think some fans did not like! (The last story,, Tintin and Alph-art, unfinished at Herge’s death, would have featured a young woman in a reasonably prominent role for the first time; perhaps Herge intended Tintin to find a girl and settle down after all! That was in the early 80s. Perhaps he was influenced by changes in comics that were occurring.)

    People should make comics like Tintin. Not copies of Tintin, but stories which honour God and God’s values. Those who do not value and love God must therefore value and love the temporary, the perishable and the mundane. It’s no wonder Gender Queer, Preacher and Love Hina and all the rest exist in such a world.

    Tintin was first published almost 100 years ago, and people still read it. People will probably be reading Tintin 100 years from now. The same cannot be said for say, Preacher, which relies on exploitation and shock value. The writer, Garth Ennis, was probably almost certainly parodying American values while at the same time exploiting them for sales and interest. When first published, it had a mild advisory on the cover — suggested for mature readers.

    Comics do attract a lot of alternative types, maybe more than other artistic media. Perhaps it is because when one can create any scene, and one is not bounded by one’s conscience or moral code, one can really ‘create’ anything. These vulgar creations are a twisted reflection of God’s actual creation. Art should honour God, not the mundane. Comics artists often wax lyrical about the ‘creative process’, the almost magical-seeming effect of ideas popping into existence, then manifesting through hard work and art.

    Why stop with comics, though? There is a lot of trash out there. Go to any art gallery. The so-called masters have been painting pornos for ages, which are in galleries all over the world. Is Playboy okay if children only don’t see it? How about the deluge of movies on Netflix that use God’s name in vain? There was even an episode of The Simpsons where Marge Simpson took the Bernard Gaynor role, seeking to ban inappropriate cartoons, but drawing the line at banning Michelangelo’s sculpture of David. She supported it because she considered it a classic of art, but her answer seemed arbitrary to me.

    In short, all creative work should honour God as the real creator. It will always be beautiful. As for David, I’m not sure I remember the scene in the Bible where Kind David gets his kit off and stands around as if posing for a photo; Michelangelo meanwhile was taking strong inspiration from earlier pre-Christian Greek sculptors, who didn’t know God, but did have a thing or two in common with the author of Gender Queer, and she with them, apparently!

    So it won’t do simply to ban books that are inappropriate for children because of a narrow, arbitrary-seeming good/bad criteria. I reiterate that I support you and those inappropriate books should not be in libraries. However, the other flank of this needs to be, “How then shall we exercise our creative talents?” We (and I include you in that pronoun!) need either to make work that honours God, or seek out work which honours God, and support it!

    Tintin is remarkable for many reasons, but one is that despite the strict boundaries he was given by his publishers, Herge still made a comic that is better than almost anything else that exists in that medium. Unlimited freedom and no moral boundaries lead to comics like Preacher and Gender Queer in this fallen world. (Though, to the publisher of the latter (DC Comics)’s very minor credit, it insisted that Ennis’s ludicrous, idiotic but still ‘shocking’ blasphemy of an angel somehow killing God toward the end of the Preacher storyline should take place off-panel.)

    What else is there in comics like Tintin? I know there is plenty, and some of it is even in our local libraries, but I’ve gone on just about long enough.

    What are most artists doing? Probably trying to make a living from their creative endeavours. Making ‘content’. Tempted not to honour God if either of those worldly goals might be met, I reckon.

    So artists? Make work which honours God! Stop honouring the mundane, the sordid, or the ‘mystery of creativity’. Honour God, the original creator! And library users, readers and viewers? Support work which honours God! Even the silly, trivial stuff you watch when you want to unwind ought to honour God.

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  2. Why are we still allowing Far Left Extremists like Yumi Stymes just to name a few to allow this disgusting vile filth to be promoted to children? The only way I’ll buy that book is to BURN IT and send a warning that Grooming and Paedophillia will not be tolerated. And to quote Pink Floyd “Hey Teacher LEAVE THOSE KIDS ALONE!”

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    • Unfortunately Craig with the type of Government we now have in charge across this country we will become a shit pit and they will claim it is the Parents’ fault as they have the control and guidance of their children. What hurts me most is the loss of wonderful men who fought and died protecting what was once a great country .

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  3. Name and shame the idiots who approve of this rubbish.

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  4. The world is in a very messed up place.

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  5. I read this comment on the website of Books Kinokuniya in Sydney:

    “This graphic memoir – graphic as in illustrated – had been brought to their attention as a title which might cause offense and they had determined it to be a submittable publication.”

    It’s also graphic in the other way (i.e. pornographic), as your examples clearly show! People do pretend to be obtuse when it suits them or their cause. I think most ordinary people, even the xe/xim mob, would feel a bit uncomfortable that say, upper primary-aged children would look at this book. Howvever, because they are invested in supporting their side, they have to support this book.

    It’s clearly aimed at young readers. If Kobabe had written it as all text, it would not attract upper primary-aged readers, unless the text was simpler, and the cover was bright and appealing to young readers.

    This book will be put with the other comics and graphic novels in libraries, and the people who go to those shelves tend to be (some) upper primary to (mostly) junior secondary age. They can borrow without the shame of showing it to anyone using the auto-checkout that most libraries now have.

    I am actually in favour of Kobabe expressing herself, but not this way. Imagine if she’d found out that the currently in vogue hyper-sex-focused worldview of Western society itself could and should be challenged, and decided to express that?

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